jill's-hydro-roses

previously carnations-by-jill

Monday, April 18, 2011

Roses Hydroponic Cultivation

By definition - the word "Hydroponic" means the art of growing plants without using soil. A Dozen Roses supplied by Tyrade Pty Ltd grows it's roses hydroponically as they are planted and cultivated in coco-peat which is a growing medium made from the milled husks of coconuts and produced in Sri Lanka.

Coco-peat has come to the fore in the rose growing industry as an ideal medium as it has good drainage properties but at the same time retains good moisture content; it is also very stable and is unaffected by fertilizers applied to it, it's consistency is very fine which is perfect for the development of fine root hairs which are responsible for most of the absorption of nutrients and water required by the rose plants. Coco-peat does not affect the pH and EC. At the end of it's life expectancy it is bio-degradable and does not present a hazard to the environment.



How the plants are grown in the broccoli boxes in the coco-peat medium. There are four plants to a broccoli box & two/three drippers to a box. Notice all the gutters under the broccoli boxes to collect any run-off water - which is then re-cycled - in a "closed re-circulated system".

The above gem of an article was found on the web page of an Australian company at the following location.

For more information on hydroponic roses, click on this article.

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posted by Jill @ 5:29 AM   0 comments

Tuesday, April 13, 2010

Hydroponic Roses Are Worth It


Roses are one of the most common flowers in the world where gardening is concerned. They are also fairly easy to grow, although they have some special considerations to take into account. Roses need a lot of water to grow properly. They do not require excessive temperatures and only require six hours of sunlight each day. Roses also may require additional carbon dioxide in order to grow properly. One of the biggest concerns for roses, even in a hydroponic garden, is pests. It seems they like roses as much as humans. Let’s explore the world of roses in your hydroponic garden.

Your hydroponic growing system will need to take several factors into account. Rose bushes can become large, so you need to give each bush at least four square feet of growing room. This allows for light to reach your roses and prevents branches from becoming entangled and harming each other. Secondly, you will need some kind of support for your roses while at the same time allowing the roots room to dangle in your hydroponic nutrient solution. A container with pebbles or other supportive growing medium will work fine. While your rose needs constant moisture, allowing the roots to remain still in the hydroponic nutrient solution will harm the roots. You will need an ebb and flow system that pumps water continuously past the roots but remains in motion.

Normal temperatures of between sixty-five and seventy-five degrees are ideal for roses. Since they only require six hours of daylight each day, you may be able to manage without gro-lights. This will depend on the location of your greenhouse and how much daily light it provides. It is always a good idea to have gro lights as backup. One of the special requirements of roses, especially in an indoor garden, is the need for additional carbon dioxide. This will require a trip to a hydroponic supply store for special carbon dioxide tanks and a mechanism to release precise amounts of it into the grow space.

Roses are often very prone to infestations. Some of this can be taken care of by having your roses indoors. Hydroponics also eliminates soil, which is the breeding ground for many insect enemies of the rose. By adding natural predator insects to your hydroponic greenhouse, you can eliminate many other harmful pests. Commercial insecticides can damage or kill your plants. These are not recommended in any case. If you find it necessary to use any product for pests, try ones like Barricade, or now Rhino Skin from Advanced Nutrients. These specially–formulated pest products have been designed to take care of any problems and do much less damage to your hydroponic garden plants.

Roses do take a little extra care when being grown in the hydroponic garden, but most gardeners feel it is worth it. Their ability to thrive in temperature and light that is readily available allows the hydroponic gardener time to concentrate on keeping the plants pest free and providing for the extra needs like carbon dioxide supplements.

Borrowed from:

http://hubpages.com/hub/Blossom-Enhancer

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posted by Jill @ 6:08 PM   2 comments

Friday, December 18, 2009

Hydroponic Roses Down Under

Pedro wants us to fly down to Australia this winter to visit this state of the art hydroponic rose growing facility. It's very tempting, especially after the freezing temperatures of late.
clipped from www.roses2go.com.au
Informative & beautiful tours of a hydroponic rose farm

A Dozen Roses is a member of the Central Coast Tourism group & is listed as an attraction on the Central Coast of New South Wales Australia. We are very excited to be able to offer visitors magnificent guided tours of the hydroponic rose farm. A Dozen Rosesis located at Lot 82A Hakone Road, Warnervale on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia.

The hydroponic rose farm was established in January 2003. This is a 100% Australian family-run business. We pride ourselves in being able to produce some of Australia’s finest fresh cut hydroponic roses at fantastic wholesale prices direct to the public.

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posted by Jill @ 6:20 PM   2 comments

Sunday, November 01, 2009

Grow Roses using Home Hydroponics

Everyone loves the smell of fresh roses, and they also present a stunningly beautiful sight in your garden.

Unfortunately, many parts of the world do not have a climate conducive to grafted roses to grow and flourish.


Fortunately, you can easily grow roses at your home with a hydroponic system.

Have you always wanted to grow a perfect red rose, along with blue, black, and purple ones? Interestingly, most of these exotic rose colors result from a variation in soil nutrients. For example, a blue rose kept in a certain type of soil will take on a reddish hue! Similarly, a red rose bush may produce yellow roses when the soil pH is not the most advantageous.

The magic of a home hydroponic system to grow roses is that you can be assured that each rose plant will get the exact nutrients that it needs. At the same time, you will also be able to control lighting and temperatures. This is especially significant if you are experimenting with rose grafting, as well as creating your own subspecies of roses. Remember that grafting roses successfully requires a great bit of patience and effort. And your rewards are in direct relation to the toil you put in!

Undoubtedly, growing roses is a challenge for most gardeners. But the pleasure of smelling your own grown roses delights the senses in a way that is ecstatic and totally in contrast to a florists’ smell of roses that have been sitting in a refrigerator.

Happily, when you create a hydroponics garden with the help of products found in Advanced Nutrients, you will be able to experiment- mesmerizing- with your roses. You may even be able to create a dazzling new rose color, or even one with multihued petals.

For more tips on improving your indoor hydroponics garden, sign up for the most in-depth hydroponic newsletter on the web.

To become a member of an ever growing group of growers who strive to take their indoor garden to the next level, join Growers Underground.

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posted by Jill @ 10:12 PM   2 comments

Hydroponic Roses

Roses are one of the most popular flowers in world. They are also fairly easy to grow, although there are a few special concerns to be addressed. Roses need a lot of water to grow well. They do not require high temperatures and only need about six hours of sunlight a day. Roses also may require additional carbon dioxide in order to grow properly. One of the biggest concerns for roses, even in a hydroponic garden, is pests. It seems they love roses as much as humans.

For a rich harvest of beautiful roses, your hydroponic growing system will need to take several factors into account. Rose bushes can become sizably large, so you need to give each bush at least 4 sq. feet of growing room. This ensures enough light reaches your roses and prevents branches from entangling and harming each other. Preferably, you should have some kind of support for your roses while at the same time allowing the roots’ room to dangle in your hydroponic nutrient solution
.

A container with pebbles or other supportive growing medium will work just perfect. While your rose needs constant moisture, allowing the roots to remain motionless in the hydroponic nutrient solution will harm the roots. You should settle for a hydroponic ebb and flow system that pumps water continuously past the roots and remains in motion. Normal temperatures (between sixty-five and seventy-five degrees) are ideal for roses. Since they only require six hours of sunlight each day, you may be able to manage without grow-lights. This will depend on the location of your greenhouse and how much daily light it provides. It is always a good idea to have grow lights as backup. One of the special requirements of roses, especially in an indoor garden, is the need for additional carbon dioxide. This will require a trip to a hydroponic supply store for special carbon dioxide tanks to pump through your hydroponic system
.

Roses are often very prone to infestations. Some of this can be taken care of by having your roses indoors. Hydroponics also eliminates soil, which is the breeding ground for many insect enemies of the rose. By adding natural predator insects to your hydroponic greenhouse, you can eliminate many other harmful pests. Commercial insecticides can damage or kill your plants. These are not recommended in any case.

If you find it necessary to use any product for pests, try ones like Barricade, found here Advanced Nutrients. These specially–formulated pest products have been designed to take care of any problems and do much less damage to your hydroponic garden plants. Roses do demand a little extra care when grown in the hydroponic garden, but most gardeners feel it is worth it. Their ability to thrive in temperature and light that is readily available allows the hydroponic gardener time to concentrate on keeping the plants pest free and providing for the extra needs like carbon dioxide supplements
.

For more tips on improving Roses cultivation in your garden, sign up for the most in-depth hydroponic newsletter on the web.

To become a member of an ever growing group of growers who strive to take their indoor garden to the next level, join Growers Underground.

posted by Jill @ 9:53 PM   2 comments

Friday, August 07, 2009

Can it be too early to love hydroponics?

Hydroponics is definitely the wave of the future. But it's nice to get proof of this once in a while. The Hooked-on-Hydroponics Awards were just announced for kids who are involved with growing fruits, vegetables, or flowers hydroponically, in a classroom setting. Read all about it at the following url. (For the best hydroponic newsletter on the web, please go to http://www.advancednutrients.com/newsletter)
When children and
teens explore how to grow plants hydroponically (without
soil),
fruitful
questions
bloom,
and these
questions can lead to active investigations and problem
solving.
These studies may even lead to classroom business opportunities
or fuel student career interests. Not least among the benefits is the joy students experience harvesting a crop of their own incredible edibles or bounteous blossoms!
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posted by Jill @ 12:39 PM   2 comments

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Hydroponic Roses? Check on the seventh floor!

It seems the future of hydroponics is certainly looking up! High-rise buildings can be transformed into vertical greenhouses to produce fruits, vegetables, and flowers in an urban setting, close to millions of hungry consumers. And yes, you can be hungry for food, but you can also be hungry for beauty! And what can be more beautiful than hydroponically grown fragrant roses?


Cities may sprout vertical farms

Proposed high-rise greenhouses could help solve a looming food crisis, professor says.

The world is going to need vertical farms because conventional agriculture can’t handle what’s to come, Despommier says. By mid­­century, the world is expected to add another 3 billion people, pushing its population close to 10 billion. Feeding all those extra mouths will require finding an area of agricultural land larger than Brazil – without cutting rain forests needed to stabilize the world’s climate.

And indoor agriculture is more efficient. One indoor acre of strawberries can produce as much as 30 outdoor acres can. In general, indoor acreage is four to six times more productive, in part because of the year-round growing season. “Outdoors, you might get one crop [per year]; indoors, you might get four or five crops per year,” Despommier says.

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posted by Jill @ 9:16 AM   2 comments

Friday, February 27, 2009

Hydroponics Fights Intolerance!

From the country that brought you Osama bin Laden, now comes news that Red Roses are banned in the desert dictatorship. I was so busy marketing our own Red Roses, I missed this news item. However, Pedro and I are considering shipping some Red Roses to Saudi Arabia, just to subvert this asinine edict! Hydroponics against stupidity!
clipped from www.guardian.co.uk

Saudi Arabia bans sale of red roses

The sale of red roses and red gifts has been banned by Saudi Arabia's religious police in the run-up to Valentine's Day, reports a local newspaper.

Officials from the Commission for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice warned flower and gift shops to remove all red items, including roses and wrapping paper, from their shelves.

The authorities believe celebrating Valentine's Day is un-Islamic and encourages relations out of wedlock, which are strictly forbidden.

The crackdown has pushed up the price of the flowers on the black market, with some florists making deliveries in the middle of the night, the paper said.


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posted by Jill @ 6:56 PM   1 comments